Lessons in Latin Prose; Consisting of Rules and Exercises and Forming an Easy Introduction to the Writing of Continuous Latin Prose by W W Bradley 0000-00-00 00:00:00

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by W W Bradley
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Lessons in Latin Prose; Consisting of Rules and Exercises and Forming an Easy Introduction to the Writing of Continuous Latin Prose by W W Bradley
Author
W W Bradley
Publisher
Theclassics.Us
Date of release
Pages
88
ISBN
9781230231860
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
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PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
5
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ... These things are necessary for living well and dying happily (or, for a good life and a happy death). Observe that this gerund thus used often answers to the infinitive active of an English verb. Paratus ad resistendum, Eeady for resistance, or ready to resist, Ad jpradcmdum emissi sunt, They were let loose to plunder. Observe also that the gerund in dum, unlike the other two, never governs a case. It would be bad Latin to say, Parati sunt ad defendendum patriam (or, ad resistendum hosti), They are ready to defend their country (or, to resist the enemy). Obs. In Quintilian we find inter agendum, in the midst of action; and Virgil speaking of young horses says, Ante domandum Ingentes toUunt animos, Before they are tamed (literally, Before the taming) they are very fiery. Similar constructions of the gerund in dum occur in the poets and later prose writers, Dut they are not to be imitated by beginners, at least not in prose; for the best authorities, Caesar, Cicero, and Livy, use this gerund after no other preposition but ad. Rule B. The supines are two in number. That in um is of an active signification, and is common to active and deponent verbs: as, amatum, to love; secutum, to follow. That in u has a passive meaning, and is found in the passive voice of transitive verbs only: as, auditu, to be heard. Strictly speaking, these supines are the accusative and ablative cases respectively of verbal substantives of the fourth conjugation. In most instances the nominative of this substantive is obsolete, but in some it is still found. Thus from video is formed visus, the seeing; and visum, visu, oblique cases of this substantive, are called the supines of the verb. We now proceed to illustrate the use of each separately:--(B. i.) The supine in...

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